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Algerian Children’s Perceptions of their Rights and their Self-Reported Personal and Contextual Experiences

posted Jun 30, 2017, 12:47 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jul 1, 2017, 1:05 PM ]

Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, Pp. 93-108
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: This research explored the relationships between the knowledge and the perceptions of children of their rights with their self-reported personal and contextual experiences. In its first part accomplishments in the area of child rights of the country of Algeria are discussed. Then, the results of a field study are presented. They concerned children of 5th grade primary and 1st year Middle schools (N=962, Mean age: 11.76, SD: 1.18, age range: 09–17 years). Measures consisted of an adapted version of an international survey questionnaire measuring children’s subjective well-being and ecological contexts in childhood and adolescence. Results indicate that less than half of the students know what children’s rights are with a marginal difference favouring girls, one third have heard of the International Convention on Child Rights (CRC) and also less than half of the respondents agree that adults respect children’s rights. Other demographic characteristics (age, family financial status, and absenteeism from school) have marginal to no deferential effect on children’s rights perspectives.

Correlations between the personal and contextual factors of well-being were found high but negative with being victim of bullying. Regression analyses indicate initially a predictive power of age and adult’s respect of children’s rights. The effects of these two factors remained strong when other contextual and personal factors were entered in the equation. The paper concluded that satisfaction with life, happiness, and well-being of children was conditioned with the improvement of diverse contextual and relational aspects of their lives. Adapted intervention strategies have been recommended towards the improvement of children’s lives in general.

 Keywords: Children’s Rights; CRC; Child Legislation; Child Well-Being; Contextual Factors of Well-Being; Personal Factors of Well-Being; Algerian Children.

 

 





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The Discourse on the Unemployment of People over 45 Years Old in Times of Crisis. A Study of Spanish Blogs

posted Jun 26, 2017, 1:24 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:55 AM ]

Diana Amber1 & Jesus Domingo
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 63-78
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: Unemployed people over 45 years old are an especially vulnerable group. The support, employment and training measures designed for them are insufficient, which has produced a problematic social situation that has been silenced by the traditional media. Nonetheless, blogs offer new means of expression with alternative discourses that show the harshness of this reality. To understand this situation, Spanish training and employment blogs that address this topic have been selected and analyzed. The sample corresponds to the set of blogs that, in the opinion of a team of experts, have been rated as the most significant and relevant. They used a Delphi technique to select them, and all of the material was studied by means of discourse analysis.
The study critically examines the different types of discourse on the topic. Diverse personal typologies have been found based on the different ways this collective understands, experiences and deals with the situation of unemployment, revealing the need for both a flexible view and a broad range of measures adapted to the distinct profiles and life situations.

Keywords: Blogs; Social Networks; Unemployment; People over 45 Years Old; Social Disadvantage.




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The Political Dynamics of Social Security Policy in Thailand before 1990

posted Jun 26, 2017, 1:15 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:55 AM ]

Wichuda Satidporn1Stithorn Thananithichot 
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 79-92
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: The policy aiming to provide the basic needs for private workers that are retired, unemployed, or unemployable due to a disability or disadvantage, the so-called social security policy, was introduced for several times in Thailand since this country began its democratization process in 1932. However, the Social Security Act was enacted and effectively in force in September 1990. Why the attempt to initiate and/or implement social security policy before 1990 succeeded or failed in Thailand? Relying on the theoretical approach that views the state as a social relation, this paper argues that social security policy has not been initiated by one particular government either in response to the demand or support of the employers or social movements, nor even the interests of the government or one particular state agency itself. Rather, the development of social security policy in a particular time was part of a broader effort to deal with and manage the tensions and conflicts that have emerged as a result of Thailand’s capitalist transition.

Keywords: State as a Social Relation; Social Security Policy; Capital Role of the State; Thailand.



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Hatos A. (Ed.). Guidebook for Sociology and Social Work on the Labor Market (Ghid Orientativ Sociologie-Asistență Socială pe piața muncii). Cluj-Napoca: Presa Universitară Clujeană, 2015, 177p.

posted Jun 26, 2017, 1:05 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:56 AM ]

Adela Lazăr
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 109-110
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

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Institutional Ties and Homeless Family Trajectories: How Homeless Mothers Engage with Policy to Create Opportunities for Mobility

posted Jun 19, 2017, 3:07 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:54 AM ]

Alex Trillo1, Giovani Burgos, & Michael Schwartz
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 41-62
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: This paper examines an understudied problem in homeless literature: the factors that affect a family’s ability to transition from a shelter to stable housing. Studies of homeless family trajectories are few and focus on the effects of individuals’ biographical characteristics, with little examination of the contexts or institutional confines in which family homelessness occurs. Most studies also assume that parents are passive service recipients who readily accept, and who do not shape, the institutional policies they encounter. This study shows that homeless parents actively navigate poverty and seek a better place to raise their families. We use qualitative data to generate a series of propositions about the dynamics of homeless trajectories – including parent logics and the ways they dynamically engage with policy amenities. We also consider the policy responses that may happen midstream in the housing search. We then test these propositions with quantitative data on trajectories. The results confirm that links to institutions play an important role in the process of exiting homelessness, but disconfirm the proposition that institutions do so by simply enhancing the biographical characteristics of their clients. Instead, these programs create spaces for fruitful relationships between homeless parents and resourceful social service workers who facilitate their entrée into the housing search process in an informal, and often unanticipated, manner. We use our results to inform an unrealized policy shift to Housing First policy – the idea that homeless parents should be housed first, and then be provided with relevant services to help them secure housing, and not conversely. 

Keywords: Poverty; Homelessness; Social Policy; Services; Homeless Trajectories; Social Capital.  


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Return to (Un)Happiness? Subjective Response of Romanians to Economic Crisis and Government Interventions between 2009 and 2012

posted Jun 16, 2017, 12:53 AM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Nov 19, 2017, 12:17 AM by Sergiu Baltatescu ]

Sergiu Bălțătescu1
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 1, pp. 97-109
Date: July 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: Very soon after the fall of the communism, Romania was confronted with an economic crisis that went on for almost ten years. With the objective of entering NATO and EU accomplished, and GDP rising to unprecedented levels, subjective well-being levels of Romanians returned to those from 1990. However, the critics looked with skepticism to this recovery, observing that the unfinished or wrongly directed reforms, together with undesirable outcomes that the capitalism brought such as increase in social inequality and anomie, conduced to a fragile economic and social system. Their apprehensions seem to be confirmed when Romania fully resented the new global economic crisis which started in 2008. In this paper I will analyze the response of Romanians to the menaces of economic crisis and government corrective measures between 2009 and 2012. I will examine variations in the structure and the inequality of subjective well-being, trying to explain how changes in the social situation of the socially excluded groups provoked a response from their part. I will show that the happiness of the Romanians decreased along these years. Partly, this had as effect the large scale protests which started at the end of 2011, which culminated with the demise of the Government. I conclude that potential for upheaval was not consumed entirely by this political change, and strong political dissatisfaction predicted further mass protest movements. 

Keywords: Subjective Well-being; Economic Crisis; Eastern European Countries; Transition. 




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Why people become teachers: A case of teachers at a rural secondary school

posted Jun 13, 2017, 2:06 PM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:53 AM ]

Clifford Gomba1
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 25-40
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: There are various reasons why people the world over join teaching, but there is limited literature exploring the reasons people joining teaching in Zimbabwe. The study was done at a secondary rural boarding school in the Midlands province of Zimbabwe. The purpose of this case study was to discover and understand why people continue to join teaching when there seem to be inherent problems in the profession. In-depth interviews, as well as document analysis, were used to collect data in this study. The 10 teachers who participated in the study were chosen through purposeful sampling and snowballing techniques and had a mean age of 39.3. The findings of the study were that the teachers joined teaching because of lack of alternatives, poor backgrounds, the need to take care of the family, love teaching and working with the kids, and failure to make the grade. It terms of benefits, the finding was that the only perceived benefit was survival. Professionalization of the profession through increased salaries, lower workload, increased cooperation between parents and schools, and the reintroduction of incentives are some of the recommendations made to encourage people to join and remain in schools. 

Keywords: Joining Teaching; Incentives; Love Teaching; Poor Background; Teachers.

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Assessing the Predictors of Political Engagement among Northern Irish Youth

posted Jun 13, 2017, 1:51 PM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 30, 2017, 12:54 AM ]

Joseph P. Vitta1
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 2, pp. 5-24
Date: December 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: Functioning societies aim to have their youth engage in the political sphere and Northern Ireland is no exception. To wit, Northern Irish academia devoted much effort to this issue with institutions such as its Institute of Conflict Research considering the matter a prime area of inquiry. This secondary data study, being focused on contributing to this discussion, employed a country-wide survey of Northern Irish youth to construct variables representing political engagement and its theory-grounded predictor constructs: social connectedness, income, gender, and educational attainment. Using these variables, a multi-linear regression model was constructed that accounted for 11.2% (r^2) of the observed variance of reported political engagement where gender (strongest), education level, social connectedness, and income (weakest) were all significant predictors/factors. The implications of the research are two-fold. On one hand, the model and its components’ being statistically significant imply that the research has identified the areas of inquiry needed to address the Northern Irish youth political engagement question. On the other, the observed weakness of the model’s predictive strength implies that more research is needed to unpack the measurements needed to properly address the issue.

 Keywords: Northern Ireland; Youth Political Engagement; Survey Research, Secondary Data Research. 

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A Screening Indicator for Holding International Non-Governmental Organizations to Standards of Professionalism and Accountability

posted Jun 13, 2017, 1:42 PM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 13, 2017, 1:45 PM ]

David Lempert1
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Online First
Date: July 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: This article offers an easy-to-use indicator to measure whether certain types of non-governmental organizations (particularly those in international “development” work) meet professional and development standards for “mission” and “vision” oriented organizations, fulfilling international legal and public policy objectives on solving the root causes of problems in sustainable ways. Use of the indicator exposes many organizations as having compromised their missions and standards for self-interest and having been corrupted by agendas of major donors that have transformed them into “businesses” serving essentially as administrative agencies for often illegal donor objectives; simply throwing money at slogans or symptoms. The indicator can be used as an accountability tool to spot and counter these abuses. The piece uses an Oxfam country office and a small new organization claiming to be in the area of “legal empowerment”, one of the new donor slogans without real content, as case studies of what has gone wrong. 

Keywords: Non-Governmental Organizations; Development; Aid; Management; Strategic Planning; Organizational Mission; Oxfam; Namati.
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The Process of Poverty Reproduction in Rural Areas. The Case of Youth from the Romanian-Hungarian Cross Border Region

posted Jun 13, 2017, 1:27 PM by Naomi Naghi   [ updated Jun 13, 2017, 1:29 PM ]

Florica Ștefănescu1 & Adrian Petru Pop 
Journal of Social Research & Policy
Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Online First
Date: July 2016
ISSN: 2067-2640 (print), 2068-9861 (electronic)

Abstract: Studies about poverty associate it with the rural areas, especially in Eastern Europe. Even after the integration in the European Union, poverty in rural areas perpetuated in the former Communist countries, at about the same level. In our paper we examine the extent to which the factors that support rural poverty are similar in the cross border area of Bihor County from Romania and Hajdú-Bihar County from Hungary. The study was conducted based on the results of a survey carried out among young people from the rural cross border regions of the two counties. The sociological research was part of the project “Facilitating the Integration of Rural Youth on the Labor Market of Bihor-Hajdú Bihar Euro-Region”, financed through the Hungary-Romania Cross-Border Co-operation Programme 2007-2013 which allowed us to study the exposure to poverty of the rural youth in correlation with the social-economic situation and status of their family. Our study confirms the hypothesis according to which the factors that influence the reproduction of poverty in the rural areas (lack of jobs, poor education, and poor infrastructure) are similar in the cross-border region between Romania and Hungary. The north-western region of Romania and the eastern part of Hungary are included in the same Euro region (Kovács, 1990) and in the same B cluster. Agriculture in the rural area on the border between the two countries cannot be characterized as being industrialized and it has two negative effects: poverty and more recently ecological issues. 

Keywords: Rural Poverty; Labor Market; Cross-Border Region; Rural Employment.

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